Essays On Punk Rock

british punk Essay

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Punk

This is Peter Inskip coming to you live from triple j, with this week’s segment in our ‘Music and Society’ series. For the next half hour we’ll be looking at the punk music scene starting in the mid-seventies.

Punk was born in the early 70’s in New York, and is still evolving.

No other style in the history of rock, has been so uncompromising, or made such a dramatic impression as Punk Rock. The two versions of punk, the original American and its British descendent, were very different.
British punk was aggressive and angry. It demanded immediate change and had no interest in working for the solution. The Sex Pistols typified British Punk with such songs as "Anarchy In The UK," which did not give a thought to anarchy's…show more content…

This generation of British youth who embraced punk left school to enter a climate of harsh unemployment and limited options. Britain in 1975 had one of its highest unemployment rates since World War II and this bleak scenario offered few alternatives. Punk for the British teenager was an outlet for their feelings of inadequacy as many young people struggled with the demoralising effects of welfare and unemployment.

British society is traditionally quite conservative and is reflected in the institution of the monarchy itself, perhaps one of the best recognised hallmarks of a social system that is very stratified, and emphasises distinct class differences. Symbols of conservative middle class order and organisation quickly became targets for the angst of disenfranchised British youth.

Punk Rock bands such as the Sex Pistols attracted a huge following and their choice of subject matter in songs like "God Save The Queen" or "Anarchy in the UK" complimented the punks’ aggression: …

God Save the Queen
The fascist regime
It made you a moron
A potential H-bomb
God save the Queen
She ain't no human being
There is no future
And England's dreaming

…This hostility clearly was a challenge aimed

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Punk Rock Essay

Punk rock is a unique and changing musical genre that was born in both England and the United States in the late 1970s. A largely underground music scene with a reliance on a rejection of societies norms, dismissal of capitalism and consumption, heavy reliance on community, and a strong attitude of do-it-yourself and self-empowerment, punk continues to have a large influence on the contemporary music scene. Punk rock, however, has faced issues when dealing with concepts of sex and gender. Bands within the scene are usually composed of males, women are objectified in song lyrics, and masculine values like aggressiveness and violence are often glamorized, especially in sub-genres of punk such as hardcore punk. But women have managed, especially through the Riot Grrrl movement, to stake out their own patch of punk rock territory. They have used punk rock to redefine concepts of gender and sexuality in such as way that empowers them and gives them choices in life, rather than having values being forced upon them.
To situate concepts of gender in punk rock, a brief look must be given to the history of punk rock. Punk started in the late 1970’s, primarily in New York and London. The New York bands were influenced by artists such as the New York Dolls, Patti Smith, and The Stooges, with the London bands being influenced by glam rock artists such as David Bowie and Mott the Hoople; as well as pub rock performers such as the 101ers. The punk movement flourished briefly between 1976 and 1983, when it lost much of the mainstream popularity that it had gained, especially in England. In America, a thriving underground punk scene developed in California. In the early Eighties, this lead to the rise of hardcore punk bands like Black Flag, Bad Brains, and Minor Threat. Independent music labels to release punk albums were developed, and included SST and Dischord Records. After the demise of many hardcore bands in the mid-Eighties, bands such as Bad Religion kept the scene going, and were influences towards punk bands that would later go on to much mainstream success such as Green Day, The Offspring, and Blink-182.
One specific moment in punk rock history that deals specifically with women, as well as issues of sex and gender, is the development of the Riot Grrrl movement in the early 1990’s. This movement came mostly out of the punk rock scene in Olympia, WA and Washington D.C. Women found themselves pushed out of punk due to the increasing aggressiveness in the punk scene, especially at concerts . Bands like Bikini Kill, and fan-publishes magazines (‘zines’) such as Jigsaw began to address the issue of women in punk rock. The first Riot Grrl Convention was held in Washington, D.C. in 1992. There were seminars dealing with writing zines and buying guitars, as well as dealing with eating disorder and fighting sexism.
Punk rock, and specifically the Riot Grrrl movement, has been used to empower women and give them control over their lives. Punk’s...

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british punk

820 words - 3 pages Punk This is Peter Inskip coming to you live from triple j, with this week’s segment in our ‘Music and Society’ series. For the next half hour we’ll be looking at the punk music scene starting in the mid-seventies. Punk was born in the early 70’s in New York, and is still evolving. No other style in the history of rock, has been so uncompromising, or made such a dramatic impression as Punk Rock. The two versions of punk, the original...

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